3 Act: It’s Not Just a Mint

Anytime I see multiple sizes of products, I immediately think of what task I could make.  I’ve had these tic tacs on my desk for about three months and finally decided to sit down and film today.  This task aligns to CCSS 5.NBT.B.6 if using long division as your objective.  It aligns to 5.NF.B.3 if using dividing whole numbers leading to answers in the form of a fraction or mixed number.  I’ve included different images for Act 3 for each.

Act 1

What do you notice?  What do you wonder?

Possible questions:

How many small boxes fit in a large box?

Give a too high and too low estimate.

Act 2

What information do you need to solve the problem?

It's Not Just a Mint Act 2

Act 3

It's Not Just a Mint Act 3 RemainderIt's Not Just a Mint Act 3 Mixed Number

As always, I would love feedback on how this could be better!

Advertisements

3 Act: The Force is On Sale

I stopped by Walgreens today to pick up some reusable grocery bags that I’ve had my eye on for a while knowing I would buy them during the after Halloween sale and found some Star Wars treasures!  Anyone who knows me knows that pretty much half of my wardrobe and household items are Star Wars…so I naturally could not pass up these yard signs!   To top it off..I was able to create this 3 Act Task:)

The task addresses CCSS 5.NBT.B.7.

Act 1

Act 1.pngIMG_3906.JPG

What do you notice?

What do you wonder?

Act 2

What information do you need?

IMG_3904.JPG

Act 3

act 3

Why was it $4.99 and not $4.995 or $5.00?

 

3 Act: Trick or Treat

I picked up some Halloween candy today for a task I’ve been wanting to create.  2/$6 at Walgreens…what a bargain!  This task addresses standard 2.NBT.B.5.  However, the bags offered an excellent surprise in that they provided a great example of making ten as well.

Act 1

What do you notice?  What  do you wonder?

About how many candy bars do you think are in the bowl?  Give a too high and a too low estimate.

Act 2

What information do you need to solve the problem?

There are 19 Almond Joy and 21 Kit Kats.

Act 3

Trick or Treat Act 3

Trick or Treat Act 3.1

Share your strategies:

Possibilities include Jumping from 21 to 31 and adding 9.

Adding 9 and 1 to get a ten and then 5 more tens.

Jumping from 19 to 29 then 39 and adding 1.

Adding 1 ten and 2 tens to get 30 and then adding 1 and 9.

3 Act: Don’t Spill the Beans!

When my son opened his box of Jelly Belly candies I couldn’t resist creating a 3 Act Math task as it was so perfectly set up in five neat compartments.  I am posting the acts here, but there are many different ways you could go with this task.  I have included several options for Act 3 depending on your goal for the lesson.  This task could be used for any of the following CCSS standards, but I have chosen to use it for 2.NBT.B.6 (yes I know it is 5 whole numbers) and 3.NBT.A.3

Act 1:

What do you notice? What do you wonder?

Possible Question: How many beans altogether?

Write a too high and a too low estimate.

Act 2:

What information do you need?

Beans Act 3 RA.png

Act 3:

Beans Act 3 Add Total.png

or

Beans Act 3 Product.png

Other possible extensions:

Which fraction is pink? brown? Write an equivalent fraction.

Here is the blank picture if you would like to change the objective and create your own Act 3:

IMG_3773.JPG

 

 

 

3 Act: Slow Your Roll

Act 1:

What do you notice? What do you wonder?

Possible questions: How many candies are in the package?

How many of each color are in the package?

Act 2:

There are white, pink, yellow, green, brown, black, orange and purple candies.  There are 40 candies altogether.

There are  5 pink candies

There are the same  number of yellow candies as pink

There are 3 less green candies than yellow

There are 4 brown and black candies

There are the same number of brown candies as there are black candies

There are 6 more white candies than pink

There are 4 less orange candies than white

There are the same number of purple candies as there are green, brown and black combined.

Act 3:

Photo:

Act 3 Photo

3 Act Task: Bubble Trouble

I have a stock pile of 3 Act tasks I have been waiting to film over the past few months and am just now carving out a few hours to get them going.

When I saw this bag of bubble gum at the store, it stood out because there were 3 flavors. My mind immediately went to structuring an addition problem with 3 addends for first grade.  Here is what I came up with.  I decided to add the ten frames for the reveal as I wanted students to pay attention to how the 8 and 2 could be combined to make a 10.  I feel like adding that opened this task up to another standard.  Please comment on how to extend the task or modify it to make it better.  It takes a math village:)

CCSS 1.OA.D.8 and 1.OA.C.6.

Act 1:

What did you notice?  What do you wonder?

What is an answer that is too high, too low?

Act 2:

What information do you need to answer the question?

There are 10 apple, 8 grape, 2 cherry

Act 3:

Why Flip Math Class?

Flipped classrooms have been the topic of conversation for the last few years.  I remember being in Italy in a small town on the Amalfi Coast and seeing a plaque for a flipped classroom.  I’m not sure why it struck me to see this type of classroom on another continent, but it did.  I had just heard about the practice and was excited that the technology in classrooms was catching up to the idea of personalized learning so that it could become a reality in the schools in which I was coaching.  Since then, I have helped many teachers start the journey of flipping their classrooms and have modeled what it can look like in multiple grade levels.  Last year, I was able to implement flipped lessons in the first grade classroom with my students in mathematics.  That experience has taught me a lot about what I find important in flipped lesson design and independent practice and allowed me to refine those components.

There is a lot of anxiety when first introducing this concept to elementary school teachers.  It’s similar to talking to high school teachers about math stations.  There is a misconception that math stations are only for elementary kids and that flipped lessons can only be implemented in high school. Although this is a common misconception, I would like to note that there are many components that must be in place in order for either to be successful.  A really great flipped lesson will incorporate opportunities for students to interact with mathematics with concrete materials or with models.  It is equally imperative that the math block consist of opportunities for students to engage in discourse and discussion.  Collaboration is key in all content areas, but in my opinion, especially in mathematics.  One of the key components to an effective flipped is bridging the link between conceptual -> pictoral -> abstract.  When introducing a concept using materials, a written model should also be provided as well as a bare number task.  This has been the missing component in building student proficiency in younger grades.

Students need to be able to connect the tasks they are completing to numerical representations.  A great way to make sure this happens is create inquiry tasks that allow students to make sense of the mathematics begin taught instead of simply following procedures.  For instance, I could pose the scenario: The answer is 12, what is the question?  Or consider the number model 3 + 4 = 7, make a Stop Motion video to tell the story of the equation.  Math isn’t about pages of problems, it is about meaningful connections and opportunities for discourse.  Once students start to see math as creative, it will change the way they approach the subject.

It can be really intimidating to record yourself on camera.   I have flipped many lessons, and it is definitely a different feeling to know that your instruction is being recorded and archived.  You are more aware of your every word, more intentional about your language, and more precise with instructional strategies.  In my opinion, that is a great thing!

Why Flip Your Classroom?

Take Two

We’ve all been there; we’ve planned the perfect lesson and know exactly how we are going to present the math, but we start the delivery and it all goes South.  When you record a lesson for students, you have the opportunity to capture your best teaching.  It’s like the difference between live television and pre-recorded TV shows.  You have the opportunity to edit and make them more refined because you are choosing and editing the best take.

Continuity

Many schools require all students in each grade-level to teach content areas at the same time with the same objective.  We could debate all day about this practice, but the key concept to take away is that we want to make sure we provide all students with a rigorous curriculum while still allowing for personalized instruction within their ZOPD.  Flipped lessons are a great way to allow students to have access to the same grade-level content, but also get the interventions they need either forward or backward.  This is done by allowing students who have the concept to complete their work and move on to newer concepts.  Students struggling with the concept can receive additional guided practice with the teachers because she/he has time to meet with them individually or in small groups.  A common misconception is that “struggling learner” means that a student has a low IQ or doesn’t have a particular subject ability.  The truth is that we all have different strengths and experiences and a student who struggles with number sense may very likely soar through geometry.  So instead of keeping that student in number sense during independent work time, let them pick their area of strength and complete it and then allow more time for assistance with areas of struggle.

Rewind -> Replay

Struggling students aren’t the only ones who need access to past lessons.  Many students who have “mastered” concepts need review at times.  As adults, we sometimes fail to realize that things we take for granted such as looking up a conversion chart on our telephones when buying something sold in mL is a learned behavior on how to navigate mathematics.  The same goes for when we need to install a new dryer and we have to look up a YouTube video on how to convert the outlet.  Students need to know how to find information when they need it and one way to do that is to provide them with past lessons to review conceptual and procedural knowledge when they need it.  I’m not embarrassed to say that I’ve had to look up how to do long division as an adult math teacher because I have accepted the fact that my brain doesn’t have to hold that information because I rarely use it.  It is rare that I am faced with a division situation that needs to be so precise that I need to use long division, and if I do, I pull out my calculator.

Game Directionsgame.png

I like to record my game directions for stations because it allows students to go back and revisit expectations if they haven’t played for a while or are having a disagreement about the rules.  This solves a lot of behavioral problems without my intervention.

 

Lesson Organization

adding 10

flipped shapesThere are many ways to organize your lessons, but I have included a picture of the way I laid out our lessons for math each day.  For young learners (and old) it is important to provide them a snapshot of the materials needed for the lesson so that once they begin the video, they have all the necessary materials to complete it.

Accountability

We used many ways for students to share their work, but the most effective way for us was the use of SeeSaw Learning Journal.  Students could upload a screenshot of their work from an app or a picture of their independent practice page or completed activity.  This was a really easy way for me to confirm if the student had completed their practice yet.  As mentioned in a previous post, I have designed a personalized learning path for students to track their own standard mastery but we did not get to implement it last year.  I’ll be sharing more of that work in future posts.

Additional Considerations

Revisit your flipped lessons regularly.  Don’t keep the same lesson if you have found better ways to teach it.  Refine your work and stay on the cutting edge of research.